Repairing A Bad Credit Score When Seeking A Job–Graduates And Unemployed May Benefit From Credit Repair

Consumers often seek to repair a bad credit score for a variety of reasons, as a more positive credit score and history will obviously lead to more affordability if an individual seeks to borrow money for a home, car, or simply getting affordable interest rates on credit cards. However, there are many advisers who feel that consumers should also seek to either repair a bad credit score or keep their credit history in good standing when seeking a job as college graduates or individuals who may be currently unemployed and looking for a job that will need to have a positive credit history in some cases as there are employers who may check on a potential employee’s credit history.

Steve Bucci at Bankrate.com has given advice on this issue, particularly for individuals who may be close to graduation from college, as entering the workforce with a terrible credit report can do a great deal of damage in some cases concerning the options that a graduate may have for acquiring an employment opportunity. While individuals who are concerned about their credit history are always advised to look at their credit report to make sure that there are no errors which could be causing a decrease in their credit score or that may lead to potential problems if a future employer were to run a credit history check, simply staying in a positive credit position can be beneficial for individuals who are in school or, for men and women who may be unemployed at the present time, this can also do damage to their chances of acquiring a job if they have a bad credit history.

There are some experts who state that an employer cannot deny an applicant a job simply because they may have a bad credit history, but many employers can view poor financial habits as disorganization, irresponsible behavior, or simply as a lack of discipline and, obviously, this could lead to questions as to whether a potential applicant would make a good employee. It’s likely that unemployed individuals or college graduates would simply be disqualified for a job because they may have a poor credit history, but again, when this is factored into the overall application and interview process, it could hinder job prospects for certain men and women.

While college students may have an easier option at maintaining a better credit history, as they can avoid doing a great deal of damage to their credit score through the use of simple financial practices, unemployed men and women who may have seen their credit score drop as a result of losing their job could have a more difficult time when it comes to repairing their bad credit. Obviously, if that employer checks an applicant’s credit history and sees that after they lost their job they had difficulties in their financial life, this can usually be forgiven or overlooked, but simple financial practices that may indicate that an applicant is irresponsible with money, and could be irresponsible in their job, could create difficulties for job seekers. For this reason, advisers are prompting both young job seekers and those who may be reentering the job market to look at their credit history and repair any damage, if possible, while they are looking for an employment opportunity or before their job search begins.